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Plasma Light Source with Liquid Light Guide


  • Broad UV to NIR Output Spectrum: 350 to 800 nm
  • Lifespan of Light Module is ≥10 000 hours
  • Typical Optical Output Power Stability of 0.5%

LLG03-4H

Ø3 mm Liquid Light Guide
(Available Separately)

HPLS343

High-Power Plasma Light Source
(Includes Liquid Light Guide)

Front Panel

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Emission Spectrum
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The Optical Spectrum Measured at the Output of the LLG
Hyperspectral Imaging Cerna Microscope
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A hyperspectral imaging system built using Thorlabs' Cerna® Microscopy Platform, KURIOS-VB1 Tunable Bandpass Filter, and HPLS343 High-Power Plasma Light Source. For details, please see the Hyperspectral Imaging tab.

Features

  • Output Spectrum: 350 nm to 800 nm
  • Typical Optical Output Power of 4.0 W for HPLS343 and 7.0 W for HPLS345, with Stability of 0.5%
  • Integrated User-Replaceable Luxim® Light Emitting Plasma™ Bulb Module with Lifetime* ≥10 000 hours
  • Variable Attenuator Continuously Tunes Optical Output Intensity from 0.1% to 100%
  • Independent Shutter Toggled via Automated and/or Manual Controls
  • Three Operation Modes:
    • Open Loop is Default and Drives the Bulb Module with Constant Current Near Rated Maximum
    • Closed Loop Varies the Current to Stabilize Bulb's Optical Output Power at 80% of Open Loop Mode Power
    • ECO Mode Varies the Current to Stabilize Bulb's Optical Output Power at 50% of Open Loop Mode Power
  • Light Source Includes a Liquid Light Guide (LLG)
    • Tip of LLG is Cooled Using Thermoelectric Coolers (TECs) to Exend LLG's Lifetime
    • Ø3 mm (Ø5 mm) Core LLG Included with HPLS343 (HPLS345)
  • Downloadable Software Enables PC Control via USB and Access to Additional Control Features
  • Connectors on Back Panel Enable External Control of Key Functions Using TTL and Analog Voltage Signals

Thorlabs' HPLS343 and HPLS 345 high-power light sources are convenient and configurable illumination systems built around the long-lived and user-replaceable Luxim® Light Emitting Plasma (LEP)™ bulb module. These light sources are designed for long-term operation, and their optical output power is typically stable to 0.5%. Each is designed to optimally couple light from the bulb into a liquid light guide (LLG), which homogenizes the transmitted bulb emission and produces a uniform output light field. The broadband wavelength spectrum extends down to 350 nm and overlaps with the common DAPI, FITC, and TRITC filter sets used in biological imaging, which makes these sources well suited for fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the wide spectrum of these sources is important for hyperspectral imaging, as explained in the Hyperspectral Imaging tab, endoscopy, and other lighting and inspection applications.

Liquid Light Guides
The HPLS343 (HPLS345) is designed to couple light from the bulb into a LLG with a Ø3 mm (Ø5 mm) core.  The advantages of LLGs including a transmitted beam free of dead spots, flexibility that allows them to be coiled, a large core size, and a high numercial aperture. Please see the LLGs tab for additional information. The Ø3 mm light guide provides a beam with higher brightness, while higher total power is coupled into the Ø5 mm LLG. It is possible to focus the beam from the Ø3 mm guide into a smaller spot, and under certain conditions this smaller core diameter may result in more power being coupled into a microscope. Coupling light from the endface of the LLG to a variety of microscopes can be enabled by using the collimation adapters available below. Thorlabs also offers an LLG to SM1 adapter for both Ø3 mm and Ø5 mm core LLGs.

These light sources use thermoelectric coolers to control the temperature of the LLG tip closest to the bulb, which extends the lifetime of the LLG. Closing the shutter during periods when the output emission of the light source is not needed will also extend the lifetime of the LLG, because this reduces its exposure to the UV radiation from the bulb. Accumulated exposure to the UV portion of the bulb's specturm increases the attenuation of the LLG, and the LLG should be replaced when transmission levels drop below those required by the application. We recommend the LLGs offered below, which differ from our standard LLG offerings only in that these have a yellow band that acts as a visual guide that indicates when the LLG is correctly installed in the LLG Port of the light source.

Optical Output Intensity
The transmitted intensity can be continuously controlled by turning a knob on the front panel, through software control, or by sending 0 V to 5 V signals to the connectors on the back panel when External control is engaged. Please see the Operation tab for more information. Adjusting the transmitted optical output intensity rotates an attenuation disk positioned between the bulb and the LLG. Being able to change the intensity coupled into the LLG without changing the current driving the bulb module enables consistently stable optical output from the source. The intensity may be adjusted independently of the shutter control.

Front Panel Display
The front panel LCD shows bright text on a dark background, which is ideal for use in dim environments and is visible from across the room and at oblique angles. The displayed information includes the percentage of the available optical power coupled into the LLG, the shutter state, and an estimate of the remaining bulb module lifetime in hours.

*Long Life Bulb Module: ≥10 000 hours
Due to the unique electrode-less design of the LEP bulb module (see the LEP™ Bulb Module tab), the lifetime of this bulb module is approximately 10 times that of a xenon bulb. The LEP bulb module ages gradually during operation when the source is operated in Open Loop mode, but when it operated in Closed Loop or Eco modes the effects of aging (decreasing optical power produced for a given driving current) are not observed until closer to the end of the bulb module's life (see the Operation tab). When the optical output power drops to 50% of the original power, which occurs after approximately 10 000 hours, the bulb module is considered to be at its end of life. However, it is not necessary to replace the bulb module until its output power can no longer fulfill the needs of your application.  

Thorlabs plans to offer replacement bulb modules for individual purchase in the future.

Specifications

Item # HPLS343 HPLS345
Performance
Wavelength Range 350 nm to 800 nm
Optical Output Powera 4.0 W (Typ.)
3.5 W (Min)
7.0 W (Typ.)
6.0 W (Min)
Ouput Power Driftb 0.2%/°C
0.05%/h
Output Power Stabilityc 0.5% (Typ.) 
0.6% (Max)
Transmitted Intensity, Range Tunable by Attenuator 0.1% to 100%
Output Intensity Non-Linearity <2%
Intensity Switch Time <3 s (10% to 90% Intensity)
Shutter States Open, Closed
Independent of Intensity Setting
Shutter Switch Time 5 ms
Shutter Repetition Rate (Max) 1 Hz (Extended Duration)
10 Hz (Burst)
Bulb Module Life Timed 10 000 h
Correlated Color Temperature (CCT)e 6000 K
Color Rendering Index (CRI)e 94
Liquid Light Guide 
Core Diameter 3 mm 5 mm
Numerical Aperture (NA) 0.59
Length 4' (1.2 m)
Operating Wavelength Range 340 nm to 800 nm
  • Measured at the output of the liquid light guide, when bulb and LLG are at start-of-life. 
  • Typical value, which includes the photo-induced darkening of the liquid in the LLG that occurs naturally during operation as a result of exposure to UV radiation.  
  • Typical standard deviation for measurements taken over an hour at the output of the LLG.
  • Average value, defined as the total operation time before the maximum optical output power of the bulb reaches 50% of its original output.
  • Prior to LLG
Additional Specifications
Communications
Baud Rate 115.2 kbps 
Data Length (1 Stop Bit, No Parity, No Flow Control) 8 Bit
Command (=) and Query (?) Formats Keyword=Argument (Carriage Return)
Keyword? (Carriage Return)
Trigger IN, Trigger OUT, and External Shutter Control 5 V TTL
Analog IN and Analog OUT
(Output Intensity Value)
0 V to 5 V Analog
20 kΩ Impedance
Connectors on Back Panel BNC Female
SMA Female
USB Type Ba
Electrical
Power Supply 90 VAC to 264 VAC
47 Hz to 63 Hz
325 VA
Fuse 5A, 250 VAC, Type T, Slow Blow
Physical
Dimensions (Length x Width x Heightb) 14.23" x 7.40" x 7.87"
(361.5 mm x 188.0 mm x 200.0 mm)
Operating Temperature Rangec,d 10 °C to 30 °C
(Open and Cosed Loop Mode)
10 °C to 35 °C
(Eco Mode)
Storage Temperature Ranged -15 °C to 70 °C
  • USB Functions as a Virtual COM Port; 2 Meter Cable Included.
  • The height dimension includes the feet, when they are folded closed.
  • Assumes Long-Term Operation
  • Non-Condensing Conditions

Mechanical Drawings

HPLS Mechanical Drawings
Mechanical Drawings of the HPLS343
The mechanical drawings of the HPLS345 differ from those of the HPLS343 only in the size of the LLG Port. This port on the HPLS345 is sized to accept the LLG05-4H.

Front Panel

HPLS Front Panel
Click to Enlarge

HPLS Series High-Power Plasma Light Source
Front Panel

Back Panel

MBX Back Panel
Click to Enlarge

HPLS Series High-Power Plasma Light Source
Back Panel
Callout Description
F1 External Control Button with Integrated LED State Indicator
F2 Liquid Crystal Display Screen
(Bright Text on Dark Field)
F3 Shutter Control Button
F4 Light Intensity Adjustment Knob
F5 Liquid Light Guide Port
F6 Liquid Light Guide Release Switch
F7 Shutter State LED Indicator
F8 Light Source State LED Indicator
F9 Power Switch
Callout Description
B1 External Shutter Control,
BNC Female Port, 5 V TTL
B2 Trigger OUT,
SMA Female Port, 5 V TTL
B3 Analog IN,
BNC Female Port, 0 to 5 V
B4 Trigger IN,
BNC Female Port, 5 V TTL
B5 Analog OUT,
SMA Female Port, 0 to 5 V
B6 USB Type B Port
B7 AC Power Plug Port
B8 Fuse Drawer
  • See the Pin Diagrams tab for pin assignments.

Pin Diagrams

Trigger IN
(Enables Intensity Output Change)

BNC Female

BNC Connector

5 V TTL 
High Logic State: 3.5 V to 5 V
Low Logic State: 0 V to 1.5 V
(Falling Edge of Pulse Enables Intensity Level Change to Analog IN Value)

Analog IN
(Specify Intensity Output Level)

BNC Female

BNC Connector

0 V to 5 V
(0.1% to 100% Output Light Intensity)

External Shutter Control

BNC Female

BNC Connector

5 V TTL
Close Shutter: High Logic State (3.5 V to 5 V)
Open Shutter: Low Logic State (0 V to 1.5 V) 

USB Type B Connector

USB type B
A host PC connects to the HPLS series light source via the USB interface. This enables command-line control. 

Trigger OUT

SMA Female

SMA-female

5 V TTL
Default: High Logic State (3.8 V to 5 V)
During Intensity Tuning: Low Logic State (0 V to 0.55 V)

Analog OUT

SMA Female

SMA-female

0 V to 5 V
(Output Voltage Proportional to Output Light Intensty Percentage of Maximum)

For more information about the functions of the Analog IN, Trigger IN, Analog OUT, and Trigger OUT and the external control of the HPLS series high-power plasma light sources, please see the Operation tab. Information about the command-line language and using a host PC to control the HPLS sources can be found in the manual and the Software tab. 

Click on the following links to move to the different sections in this discussion.

 

Output Intensity and Shutter Control

Linear Intensity Tuning
Click to Enlarge

Figure 1: The HPLS343 and HPLS345 light sources are calibrated to give a linear ratio between the intensity setting and the transmitted optical power. The red curve is an example of the typical error that exists between the calculated and measured output powers. For additional details, please see the text.

Output Intensity Control: Rotate the Light Intensity Control Knob on the Front Panel to continuously vary the intensity of light transmitted through the liquid light guide (LLG). Output intensity control operates independently of the shutter, and control of the intensity setting using the tuning knob and software may be performed regardless of whether the shutter is open or closed. 

When a host PC is interfaced with the HPLS343 or HPLS345, the operator can also use the software to specify an intensity value between 0.1% and 100% of the maximum possible optical output power. While operating the light source under External control, the intensity can be changed by sending the appropriate voltage signals to BNC ports on the instrument's back panel. When External control is enabled, the intensity tuning knob on the front panel is disabled. More information about External control and software control is included in Sections 5.5 and Chapter 7, respectively, of the manual.

Adjusting the output intensity does not affect the amount of optical power emitted by the bulb; the current driving the bulb is not affected by the intensity adjustment. Instead, the intensity adjustment controls the rotation angle of an attenuation disk placed between the bulb and the LLG. The disk has an aperture that varies with rotation angle, and adjustments to intensity cause the disk to rotate so that the desired amount of optical power is transmitted through the disk and is coupled into the LLG. 

Using an attenuation disk to adjust the transmitted intensity, rather than performing this function by changing the current levels driving the bulb module, maintains the bulb in a stable operating state while also enabling the intensity to be quickly tuned; less than 3 seconds are required to adjust the output intensity between 90% and 10%.

The output powers of these high-power plasma light sources are calibrated so that the output power is a linear function of the intensity setting, as is illustrated by the blue curve in Figure 1. The intensity setting is reported as a percentage in the upper left corner of the display screen on the front panel, and its value is independent of the power emitted by the bulb. The red curve in Figure 1 is an example of the typical error between the measured power at the output tip of the LLG and the predicted value of the output power calculated from the intensity setting and the calibration data. Each point on the error curve represents an average of 100 measurements. For optimum stability, allow these light sources to warm up for between 45 minutes and an hour before use.

Shutter Control: The shutter state can be toggled between open and closed by pressing the rectangular button beside the Light Intensity Control Knob, by sending the appropriate command to the light source when it is being controlled by a host PC, or by sending a 5 V TTL signal to the Shutter Control female BNC port on the back panel when external control is enabled. The shutter is closed by default, and the state of the shutter (Open/Closed) is displayed in the lower left corner of the front panel's display screen. When the shutter is open, the LED indicator to the right of the shutter control button is illuminated. The shutter button is always operational, but pressing it while the light source is operating under external control will disable external control of the light source.

Closing the shutter during periods when the output emission of the light source is not needed will extend the lifetime of the LLG. Exposure to the UV portion of the spectrum produced by these high-power light sources causes the transmissive properties of LLGs to gradually degrade, and closing the shutter blocks the coupling of the Luxim­® LEP™ bulb's light into the LLG.

The shutter may be repetitively toggled between states with a repetition rate of up to 1 Hz for an indefinite duration, and its state may be toggled at rates up to 10 Hz during bursts of a few minutes at most. If the shutter state is toggled at rates in excess of 1 Hz for longer than a few minutes, the heat generated by this activity can cause the shutter to fail.  


Software Control via a Host PC

For greater control of the light source and more configuration options than are offered by the front panel interface, the HPLS343 and HPLS345 can be controlled by a host PC. A software package is available for download that includes drivers and installs a GUI. Control of the light source may be performed using the GUI or by running custom user-written programs. Please see the Software tab for more information. Prior to running a custom program via the command-line interface, install the drivers included in the software download, power on the light source, and connect a USB cable between the PC and the light source. The GUI and command line language, listed and described in Chapter 7 of the manual, allow the user to:

  • Obtain Various Status and Instrument Identification Information
  • Turn the Bulb On and Off
  • Set the Output Intensity Optical Power
  • Set the Shutter State
  • Set the Operation Mode: Open Loop, Closed Loop, and Closed Loop Eco Modes
  • Toggle Between External (Voltage Signals Sent to Back Panel Connectors) and Local (Front Panel and PC) Operation  

Information Shown on LCD Screen During Operation

Open Loop Mode Display Screen
Click to Enlarge

Figure 2: Open Loop Mode: Example of LCD Screen   

The Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen features bright text on a dark background, and the text remains visible from across the room and at oblique angles. The dark background emits less light into the room than do displays featuring dark text on a bright background, which makes it less disruptive under dim lighting conditions. The display, an example of which is shown in Figure 2, has five different fields:

  • Upper Left Corner: The transmitted light intensity, which is controlled by tuning the attenuator positioned between the LLG and bulb, is shown. 
  • Upper Right Corner: MANUAL indicates front panel and PC control, and EXTERNAL indicates control via back panel connectors is enabled.
  • Lower Right Corner: The estimated remaining lifetime of the bulb module counts down from 10 000 hours.
  • Lower Left Corner: The shutter state, which is either Open or Close, is displayed.
  • Center: When operating in Open Loop Mode, nothing is displayed in the center (see the image at the right). The letter "C" is displayed when operating in Closed Loop Mode, and the letter "E" is displayed when operating in Eco Mode. Information about the different operating modes and examples of the Closed Loop and Eco display screens are shown in Figures 4 and 5, respectively.

Operation Modes: Open Loop, Closed Loop, and Closed Loop Eco

Theoretical Lifetimes of the LIFI Bulb Module for Operation in the Three Modes
Click to Enlarge

Figure 3: Theoretical Calculations of the Output Power of the Bulb with Respect to Time and when Operated in Open Loop, Closed Loop, and Eco Modes, Assuming Continuous Operation over the 10 000 Hours 

The HPLS343 and HPLS345 feature three different operation modes: Open Loop, Closed Loop, and Closed Loop Eco. When the operating mode is changed, the driving current sent to the bulb is affected. This is in contrast to using the front panel knob, software, or back panel connection controls to adjust the intensity, which changes the coupling ratio between the bulb and the liquid light guide but does not affect the current driving the bulb. Calculations of the theoretical bulb output powers as a function of time, and with respect to operating mode, are plotted in Figure 3.

The default operation mode, which is set at the factory, is Open Loop mode. When a PC is interfaced with the light source, the operation mode can be changed using the GUI or command-line interface. It is not possible to change the operation mode via interaction with the front panel or when external control is enabled. Changing the operation mode updates the operation mode setting stored in non-volatile memory. When the light source is powered on, the active operation mode is the one that was active when the source was last powered down.

Open Loop Mode: This is the default operation mode, which is set at the factory and produces the highest optical output power from the bulb. In this mode, the current driving the lamp is held constant near the current limit. As the optical output intensity of the bulb is not stabilized, this intensity can be expected to slowly vary during short-term operation. Over longer durations, the output intensity of the bulb will gradually decrease as the bulb ages. Figure 2 shows an example of the display screen corresponding to operation in Open Loop Mode.

Closed Loop Mode Display Screen
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Figure 4: Closed Loop Mode: Example LCD Screen 
Closed Loop ECO Mode Display Screen
Click to Enlarge

Figure 5: Eco Mode: Example LCD Screen

Closed Loop Mode: In Closed Loop mode, the optical output power of the bulb is stabilized at a target level using a feedback mechanism. An initialization process that occurs at start-up determines the target intensity. During initialization, the bulb is driven at a constant current level of approximately 90% of the current limit. A photodiode located near the bulb measures the optical output intensity, and then the target optical output power level for this mode is set to be 80% of this measured value. During operation, this optical output power is maintained by using a feedback mechanism to adjust the bulb's driving current as appropriate. Closed Loop mode operation provides a more stable output intensity than Open Loop mode, and it also compensates for the gradual decrease in the lamp's optical output power that occurs as the bulb ages. The letter "C" in the top-center of the LCD display shown in Figure 4 indicates the light source is operating in Closed Loop mode.

Eco Mode: This mode operates similarly to Closed Loop mode, with the difference being that Eco mode stabilizes the optical output power at a lower intensity. Rather than stabilize the optical output power of the bulb at 80% of the Open Loop mode power, as is done in Closed Loop mode, Eco mode stabilizes the optical output power of the bulb at 50% of the Open Loop mode power. A benefit of operating at this lower power level is that the bulb suffers less heat stress than it does when operating in the standard Closed Loop mode, and this is expected to extend the lifetime of the bulb beyond 10 000 hours. As is true when operating in the standard Closed Loop mode, Eco mode compensates for both transient variations in the optical output power of the bulb and the gradual decrease in the lamp's optical output power. The letter "E" in the top-center of the LCD display shown in Figure 5 indicates the light source is operating in Eco mode.

Click on the More [+] link below to view plots illustrating the effects of the operating mode and liquid light guide (LLG) on the intensity of the transmitted light. Data were acquired over a continuous 48 hour period, and measurements were recorded both just before the input and at the output of the LLG. Results are plotted for Open Loop and Closed Loop modes, with the Closed Loop mode data also applying to Eco mode.

The measurements taken at the input of the LLG describe time-dependent bulb intensity independent of other effects. The measurements taken at the output of the LLG include the optical transmission characteristics of the LLG. As is discussed in the LLGs tab, LLGs act to homogenize the light transmitted through them, which smooths the time-dependent intensity data curves. In addition, the light transmission levels through LLGs decrease with time in response to exposure to UV radiation. While operation in Closed Loop or Eco modes maintains the optical output power of the bulb at the target level, these modes do not compensate for the attenuation of the transmitted light through the LLG that increases with time as a result of the aging of the liquid in the guide.

Graphs of Optical Intensity Measured at the Input and Output Endfaces of the LLG, Open and Closed Loop Operation, 48 Hour Duration

Open Loop Intensity Stability Before LLG
Click to Enlarge

Output power intensity monitored immediately before the input to the LLG is plotted with respect to time. Open Loop mode drives the bulb at constant current and does not maintain constant output power, which results in variations of the output power and a gradual decrease in optical intensity as the bulb ages.

Open Loop Intensity Stability Before LLG
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Output power intensity monitored immediately before the input to the LLG is plotted with respect to time. Closed Loop mode uses a feedback loop to stabilize the output power of the bulb. This mitigates variations in optical output power and compenstates for the gradual decrease in output intensity as the bulb ages.

Open Loop Intensity Stability After LLG
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Output power intensity monitored at the output of the LLG is plotted with respect to time. The intensity measured at the output of the LLG includes the transmission characteristics of the LLG. The LLG homogenizes the transmitted light, and its attenuation levels gradually increase as the liquid is exposed to ultraviolet light. The transmitted intensity measured at the output of the LLG decreases gradually with time due to the progressive darkening of the LLG as well as the gradual decrease in bulb intensity with time, which is due to the aging of the bulb and is not compensated for in Open Loop mode.

Closed Loop Intensity Stability After LLG
Click to Enlarge

Output power intensity monitored at the output of the LLG is plotted with respect to time. The intensity measured at the output of the LLG includes the transmission characteristics of the LLG.  The LLG homogenizes the transmitted light, and its attenuation levels gradually increase as the liquid is exposed to ultraviolet light. The transmitted intensity measured at the output of the LLG decreases gradually with time due to the progressive darkening of the LLG, but Closed Loop mode compensates for the gradual decrease in bulb intensity with time due to the aging of the bulb.


External Control via Back Panel BNC and SMA Connections

External control of the light source is enabled by pressing the button labeled "External," which is located above the LCD display on the front panel of the instrument. After the button is pressed, it illuminates and stays illuminated while External mode is active. Enabling External control disables both software (PC) and front panel control, with the exception of the shutter. Both the shutter button on the front panel and software control of the shutter remain active for safety reasons; however, using one of these methods to toggle the shutter will automatically disable External control and return the instrument to Local control, in which the front panel and PC control are active.

External control of the light sources is performed by sending signals to a trio of female BNC connectors of the back panel of the instrument (Shutter Control, Analog IN and Trigger IN). The back panel also includes a pair of female SMA output connectors that provide access to status information (Analog OUT and Trigger OUT). Please see the Front & Back Panels tab for information about the Back Panel connectors.

The liquid cores of LLGs gradually become less transmissive with increasing exposure to UV light. As the Luxim® LEP™ bulb spectrum extends into the UV, the LLGs used to transmit light from these high-power sources will gradually become more absorptive with use. When the transmission properties of an LLG drops below usable levels, the LLG should be replaced. This will occur before the LEP bulb module reaches its end-of-life. Closing the shutter during periods when the output emission of the light source is not needed will extend the lifetime of the LLG by blocking the coupling of the LEP bulb's light into the LLG. 

Installing and Removing a Liquid Light Guide

While all of Thorlabs' standard Ø3 mm (Ø5 mm) liquid light guides are compatible with the HPLS343 (HPLS345), the LLG03-4H (LLG05-4H) are recommended for these light sources. These LLGs feature a yellow band near one end. The yellow band acts as a visual indicator that helps the user determine when the LLG is properly seated in the light source. When a LLG without the yellow band is used with these sources, it can be difficult to know when the LLG is correctly installed in the light source.

To insert the LLG, slide it into the LLG port as shown in Figure 1. The LLG is fully inserted when the edge of the yellow marker ring is flush with the front panel, as shown in Figure 2. To remove the LLG, press up on the LLG Release switch and pull out the LLG, as shown in Figure 3. The light sources detect when a LLG is installed in the LLG Port. If there is no LLG present, the light source closes the shutter, and the shutter cannot be opened until a LLG is in place. This protects the user from exposure to the intense light emitted by the source.

To protect the tips of the LLGs from damage and to keep them as clean as possible, cover exposed LLG tips with their dust covers. Ensure that the tip of the LLG is free of grease, dust, and other contaminants before inserting it into the light source. For information on how to clean the tip, see the section following Figures 1 through 3.

Linear Intensity Tuning
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Figure 3: To remove the LLG, press up on the Release LLG switch and pull out the LLG.
Linear Intensity Tuning
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Figure 2: As shown above, the LLG is correctly installed when the edge of the yellow band is flush with the front panel of the light source. 
Linear Intensity Tuning
Click to Enlarge

Figure 1: After ensuring the tip closest to the yellow band is clean, slide that tip into the LLG Port. Continue to push the end of the LLG into the port until the edge of the yellow band is flush with the front panel (Figure 2).

Liquid Light Guide Overview

LLG0338-6
Click to Enlarge
Figure 4: Plotted are typical transmision data for a 6' Long LLG, with the recommended operation wavelength range shaded blue. As a function of length, only minimal variations (<5%) are expected between our 4' (1.2 m), 6' (1.8 m), and 8' (2.4 m) long liquid light guides. The LLGs recommended for use with these high-power light sources is 4'.
LLG0538-6
Click to Enlarge

Figure 5: Plotted are typical transmision data for a 6' Long LLG, with the recommended operation wavelength range shaded blue. As a function of length, only minimal variations (<5%) are expected between our 4' (1.2 m), 6' (1.8 m), and 8' (2.4 m) long liquid light guides. The LLGs recommended for use with these high-power light sources is 4'.

A variety of applications benefit from the heat and vibration isolation achieved by routing the optical power output by a light source from a distant location to where it is needed. The HPLS343 and HPLS345 have been designed to accept liquid light guides (LLGs) with Ø3 mm and Ø5 mm cores, respectively. LLGs are flexible light pipes fabricated from a polymer tube filled with a transparent, non-toxic, and non-flammable liquid. The tips of the tube are sealed with fused silica caps, which also act as optical end faces. Transmission through the LLG homogenizes the light field across the diameter of the core, which produces an output beam with uniform intensity. The many advantages of pairing a LLG with a high-power and broadband light source include:

  • A Homogenous Transmitted Beam Free of the Dead Spots that Characterize the Light Field from a Silica Fiber Bundle
  • The Ability to Coil and Arrange the LLGs, in Contrast to Silica Rods of Comparable Diameters that Break if Bent
  • The Large Core Size and High Numerical Aperture of the LLG
  • Excellent Transmission over the Entire Visible Spectral Range (Figures 4 and 5)

The limitations of LLGs include a maximum operating temperature of 45 °C for long durations and 60 °C for durations of less than an hour. The HPLS343 and HPLS345 light sources protect the LLG against excessive temperatures by monitoring the temperature of the tip of the LLG closest to the bulb, cooling the tip as required using a combination of thermoelectric coolers and fans, and powering down the light source if necessary. The LLG can operate indefinitely at temperatures below 45 °C. At higher temperatures, bubbles form in the liquid, which degrades the transmission properties of the LLG. These bubbles can be reabsorbed by the liquid if the temperature of the LLG exceeds 45 °C, but is no more than 60 °C, for less than an hour, and if the LLG is allowed to cool after being subjected to these elevated temperatures. We recommended a cool-down time of no less than 30 minutes. Temperatures in excess of 60 °C can result in permanent bubbles forming in the liquid, which will have a severe negative impact on the transmission properties of the LLG, and these high temperatures can also cause structural damage by degrading the seals between the various structural components of the guide. 

LLGs, while flexible, also posses minimum bend radii. See the table below for the minimum bend radii of these LLGs. The tubes will develop permanent kinks if forced into a bend tighter than the minimum specification.

Reduction in Transmission with Exposure to Ultraviolet Light: The liquid in LLGs gradually becomes less transmissive with increasing exposure to UV light. As the LEP bulb spectrum extends into the UV, the LLGs used with the HPLS sources will gradually become more absorptive with use. When the transmission properties drop below usable levels, the LLG should be replaced. 

Cleaning the Optical End Faces of Liquid Light Guides: The fused silica, Teflon™, and metal (either aluminum, chrome plated brass, or stainless steel) materials composing LLGs are resistant to common cleaning solvents; however, the tips of the LLGs should not be submerged in solvent, and neither should a heavily soaked cleaning pad be applied to the tip. Saturating the tip with solvent can result in the solvent penetrating the seal between the silica end face and the polymer tube and damaging the guide. If debris cannot be removed from the end face by wiping it with solvent, a razor blade, handled gently, can be used to clean the tip. If a razor blade is used, ensure that it does not chip the edge of the fused silica glass end face.

Liquid Light Guide Dimensions and Minimum Bend Radius:

Active Core Diameter Standard End Fittings Protective Sleeve Min. Bending Radius
d0 d1 l1 d2 l2 d3  
3 mm 5 +0/-0.1 mm 20 ± 0.1 mm 9 ± 0.1 mm 24 ± 0.1 mm 7 ± 0.1 mm 40 mm
5 mm 7 +0/-0.1 mm 20 ± 0.1 mm 10 ± 0.1 mm 24 ± 0.1 mm 9.5 ± 0.1 mm 60 mm

The drawing and photograph below illustrate the dimensions given in the table above. 180 ± 1° indicates the flatness tolerence between the metal and black material in the segment labled l2.

LLG DrawingFigure 6: Diagram of a LLG Tip, with End Face at Left
LLG Photo Schematic
Figure 7: End portion of a LLG with Key Dimensions Labeled.
Emission Spectrum
Click to Enlarge

Diagram of the LEP Bulb Module Architecture

The user-replaceable Luxim® Light Emitting Plasma (LEP)™ bulb module at the core of the HPLS343 and HPLS345 is an intense source of full-spectrum white light and has a lifetime of at least 10 000 hours. A major contributing factor to its long life, which is ten times that of a xenon bulb, is a design that includes no electrodes and is strikingly different than the design of metal-halide discharge lamps and other conventional light sources.

The sketch in Figure 1 depicts the architecture of the LEP bulb module. Contained within the ceramic resonator are two antennas, and the sealed quartz bulb is positioned at the center. The bulb is contains a small amount of a halide salt mixture as well as inert and other gasses. The radio frequency (RF) driver is connected to the power input and feedback antennas using low-loss coaxial cables. When operating, the electric circuit generates an RF field, which is amplified and concentrated by the structure of the ceramic resonator. The bulb position coincides with the most intense region of the RF field, and the energy of the field ionizes the gasses and vaporizes the halides contained in the quartz bulb. The ionized gases transfer energy to the metal halide salts, which form an intense plasma column at the center of the bulb. This is the highly-efficient source of the intense full-spectrum white light. A reflective material located at the back of the lamp is used to direct all generated light into the forward direction.

In conventional metal-halide discharge lamp designs, a plasma is formed inside the bulb by transmitting a high-energy pulse across the two electrodes. Each pulse not only creates a plasma in the bulb but also vaporizes some of the electrode material, which both erodes the electrodes and deposits a metal on the bulb. This degrades the performance of the lamp and leads to its failure. In addition, the electrodes act as heat sinks that draw power away from the bulb. The driving energy applied to the bulb must be high enough to overcome these losses.

The LEP bulb module, by energizing a plasma arc without using filaments or electrodes, elininates all failure modes and inefficiencies of traditional broadband light sources, which results in an incredibly bright and stable source with long life span comparable only to light emitting diodes (LEDs).

The LEP bulb module is considered to be at the end of its life when, for a given driving current, the optical output intensity of the bulb drops to 50% of the intensity it produced when it was new. The bulb module package includes the ceramic resonator, quartz bulb, and heatsink. Replacing the bulb module package is a straight-forward procedure that can be performed by the user. Each bulb module has its own serial number that is read by the HPLS343 and HPLS345, and lifetime information for up to two bulb modules is stored in memory. This allows users to swap between two operational bulb units while preserving information about how long each has operated (the lifetime countdown).

Screen Capture of the HPLS High-Power Plasma Source Software GUI for External Control
Click to Enlarge

The GUI for the HPLS High-Power Plasma Light Sources

Software for the HPLS343 and HPLS345 High-Power Plasma Light Sources

An external host PC can control the operation of the HPLS343 and HPLS345 high-power plasma light sources. Users can choose to operate the source through a GUI or by writing and running custom programs. The drivers and software that enable both methods of control can be downloaded by clicking on the following link. An image of the GUI is shown in the image to the right and described in Chapter 7 of the manual, while the command-line language used to write custom programs is described in Chapter 8. Prior to running a custom program via the command-line interface, the downloadable drivers should be installed, the instrument should be powered on, and a USB cable should be connected between the host PC and the USB type B port on the back panel of the light source.

The basic command structure is a keyword, followed by an equals sign (=), followed by a character string, and terminated by a carriage return (CR). An example of a command is LAD=3 (CR), which sets the operation mode of the light source to Eco mode. The query command structure is a keyword, followed by a question mark (?), and terminated by a carriage return. An example of a query is LLG? (CR), which will return the temperature of the tip of the liquid light guide.

Software

Version 1.2.0 (March 27, 2017)

Firmware

Version 1.1 (May 30, 2017)

Software Download
HPLS343 and HPLS345 Complete System Components Accessories
Click to Enlarge

HPLS343 and HPLS345 System Components

Items Included with Each HPLS343 and HPLS345 Plasma Light Source:

  • One Light Source Unit
  • One Liquid Light Guide (LLG03-4H for the HPLS343, LLG05-4H for the HPLS345)
  • One Power Cord
  • One USB2.0 A-B Cable, 2 Meters Long
  • One 2 mm Hex Key
  • One 3 mm Hex Key
  • One Operation Manual 
Hyperspectral Imaging with Cerna
Click to Enlarge

Schematic of Hyperspectral Imaging
Hyperspectral Imaging Cerna Microscope
Click to Enlarge

A hyperspectral imaging system built using Thorlabs' Cerna® Microscopy Platform, KURIOS-VB1 Tunable Bandpass Filter, 1501M-GE Monochrome Scientific Camera, and the HPLS343 High-Power Plasma Light Source. Please contact technical support for infomation on building this system.

Application Idea: Hyperspectral Imaging

In hyperspectral imaging, a stack of spectrally separated, two-dimensional images is acquired. This technique is frequently used in microscopy, biomedical imaging, and machine vision, as it allows quick sample identification and analysis.

Hyperspectral imaging obtains images with significantly better spectral resolution than that provided by standalone color cameras. Color cameras represent the entire spectral range of an image by using three relatively wide spectral channels—red, green, and blue. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging systems incorporate optical elements such as liquid crystal tunable bandpass filters or diffraction gratings, which create spectral channels with significantly narrower bandwidths.

Thorlabs' Cerna® microscopy platform, Kurios® tunable filters, and scientific-grade cameras are easily adapted to hyperspectral imaging. The Cerna platform is a modular microscopy system that integrates with Thorlabs' SM lens tube construction systems and supports transmitted light illumination. Kurios tunable filters have SM-threaded interfaces for connections to the Cerna platform and our cameras. In addition, Kurios filters include software and a benchtop controller with external triggers, which enable fast, automated, synchronized wavelength switching and image capture.

Example Image Stack
The data in the images and video below demonstrate the hyperspectral imaging technique. Figure 1 depicts two images of a mature capsella bursa-pastoris embryo (also known as shepherd's-purse) taken with a Kurios filter set to center wavelengths of 500 nm and 650 nm. These two images show that an entire field of view is acquired at each spectral channel. Figure 2 is a video containing 31 images of the same sample, taken at center wavelengths from 420 nm to 730 nm in 10 nm steps. (10 nm is not the spectral resolution; the spectral resolution is set by the FWHM bandwidth at each wavelength.) In Figure 3, images from each spectral channel are used to determine the color of each pixel and assemble a color image. Figure 3 also demonstrates that a broadband spectrum is acquired at each pixel, permitting spectroscopic identification of different sample features within the field of view.

Kurios tunable filters offer a number of advantages for hyperspectral imaging. Unlike approaches that rely upon angle-tunable filters or manual filter swapping, Kurios filters use no moving parts, enabling vibrationless wavelength switching on millisecond timescales. Because the filter is not moved or exchanged during the measurement, the data is not subject to "pixel shift" image registration issues. Our filters also include software and a benchtop controller with external triggers, making them easy to integrate with data acquisition and analysis programs.

LCTF Spectrum
Click to Enlarge
Figure 3: A color image of the mature capsella bursa-pastoris embryo, assembled using the entire field of view acquired in each spectral channel, as shown in Figure 1. By acquiring across multiple channels, a spectrum for each pixel in the image is obtained.
LCTF Spectrum
Click to Enlarge
Figure 1: Two images of a mature capsella bursa-pastoris embryo taken at different center wavelengths. The entire field of view is acquired for each spectral channel.

Figure 2: This video shows the image obtained from the sample as a function of the center wavelength of the KURIOS-WB1 tunable filter. The center wavelength was incremented in 10 nm steps from 420 nm to 730 nm. (10 nm is not the spectral resolution; the spectral resolution is set by the FWHM bandwidth at each wavelength.)


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Posted Comments:
Poster:
Posted Date:2015-06-05 05:48:56.04
It's not clear to me how to tell when the beam is collimated when using the collimating adapters. While the shape slightly changes there is no real apparent change in the beam diameter due to the nature of the source. What should I be looking for?
Poster:besembeson
Posted Date:2015-08-28 05:22:18.0
Response from Bweh at Thorlabs USA: At medium power, for example, when you observe the spot size along the optical axis a few meters away (~5m), you should see this increase and decrease as you adjust the separation between liquid light guide output and collimating lens.
Poster:william.dorward
Posted Date:2015-03-31 10:04:58.81
I am looking for a contact to discuss possible light guide options and beam shaping options for an LED source that i am developing, would there be an available contact for the manufacturer of these devices that I could discuss some custom options and requirements?
Poster:jlow
Posted Date:2015-03-31 01:15:24.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: You can contact us at techsupport@thorlabs.com with your application information and we will route it to the best person.
Poster:cbrideau
Posted Date:2013-09-18 12:45:08.22
It would be very helpful to be able to access the lamp temperature and/or temperature warning state using the external control command set. In the manual I don't see a command for reporting temperature.
Poster:jlow
Posted Date:2013-09-19 10:17:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: We do not currently provide access to the temperature data. We will look into the possibility of adding in this feature in our future firmware upgrade.
Poster:
Posted Date:2013-03-13 23:15:34.28
Does the light source include a (electronic) shutter? If yes, how fast is it?
Poster:jlow
Posted Date:2013-03-14 13:19:00.0
Response from Jeremy at Thorlabs: In the HPLS243 and HPLS245, there's an internal beam block /shutter mechanism that is only used to block the light into the LLG during turn on. The reason being is that the bulb always fires to 100% intensity then attenuates to its set-point. The internal shutter is controlled by the light source during turn on only, and cannot be controlled by the end user. The open time is measured to be about 7.0ms.
Poster:bdada
Posted Date:2012-01-25 14:33:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for using our online feedback forum. The output port of the lamp is only compatible with the Thorlabs supplied Liquid Light Guides (LLG) and there is no thread associated with it. The LLG is held in place with a lock nut after it is inserted into the port. We will soon release an LLG to SM1 adapter. We will also update our drawing to include dimensions for the output port and other details that are currently missing. Please contact TechSupport@thorlabs.com if you have any questions.
Poster:acable
Posted Date:2012-01-17 18:04:51.0
The mechanical drawing is really sparse, specifically i need details on the output aperture. Dtails such as the diameter, is it threaded (hoping for SM05 threads), are there any provisions for attaching a 30 mm cage system.

Below is a selection guide for all of our white-light, broadband illumination sources (or lamps). In addition to these sources, Thorlabs also offers an unmounted white-light LED, five white-light mounted LEDs, two white-light fiber-coupled LEDs, and three high-powered, white-light Solis™ LEDs.

Lamp Selection Guide
(Click Representative Photo to Enlarge; Not to Scale)
Item HPLS343 HPLS345 SLS201L(/M) SLS202L(/M) SLS203L(/M) SLS301 SLS401 SLS402 OSL2 QTH10(/M) XCITE120LED XCITE200DC
Type Plasma Tungsten-Halogen Tungsten Globar Tungsten-Halogen Xenon Arc Mercury-Xenon Arc Tungsten-Halogen Quartz Tungsten-Halogen LED Mercury Arc
Wavelength 350 nm - 800 nm 360 nm - 2600 nm 450 nm - 5500 nm 500 nm - 9000 nm 360 nm - 3800 nm 240 nm - 2400 nm 400 nm - 1300 nm 400 nm - 2200 nm 370 nm -
700 nm
340 nm -
800 nm
Spectrum Plot
Output Coupling Liquid Light Guide Fiber Coupled (SMA),
Liquid Light Guide, or
Free Space
Free Space Free Spacea Fiber-Coupled Fiber Bundle Free Space Free Space Liquid Light Guide
Output Power 4 W(Typ.) 7 Wb (Typ.) 10 mWc
500 mWd
2 mWe
400 mWd
>1.5 Wd >1.6 Wf >1.3 Wf 1.4 Wg 50 mWh
(Typ.)
Not Available Not Available
Bulb Electrical
Power
- 9 W 7.2 W 24 W 150 W 150 W 10 W Not Available Not Available
Color
Temperature
6000 Ki 2796 K 1900 K 1500 K 3400 K 5800 K 6000 K 3200 K 2800 K Not Available Not Available
Lifetime 10 000 hj 10 000 h (Avg.) 10 000 h (Avg.) 10 000 h (Avg.) 1000 hk (Avg.) 2000 hj 1000 to
10 000 h
to 50% Brightness
2000 h >25 000 h >2500 h (Typ.)
Replacement
Bulb
- SLS251 SLS252 SLS253 SLS301B SLS401B SLS402B OSL2B,
OSL2B2, or
OSL2BIR
QTH10B Not Available Not Available
  • Liquid light guide (LLG) adapters are available separately to couple the free-space output.
  • Measured at the output of the liquid light guide, when both the bulb and the LLG are at start-of-life.
  • Fiber-coupled optical power, measured with included M28L01 fiber patch cable at beginning of bulb lifetime.
  • Free-space optical power, measured at the output port of the light source with the fiber coupler removed.
  • Measured with Thorlabs' MZ41L1 ZrF4 MIR patch cable at the beginning of bulb lifetime.
  • At Beginning of Bulb Lifetime
  • Power of Fiber Tip at Maximum Bulb Intensity
  • Measured by focusing the output beam after the ACL5040U condenser lens onto an S302C thermal power sensor with an MPD508762-90-P01 protected silver off-axis parabolic mirror.
  • Prior to LLG
  • Average lifetime of bulb, defined as the total operation time before the maximum optical output power of the bulb reaches 50% of its original output.
  • Average lifetime of bulb, defined as the time elapsed when the controller cannot stabilize the output power of the bulb.

High-Power Plasma Light Source with Liquid Light Guide

  • Integrated Luxim® LEP™ Bulb Module with ≥10 000 Hour Lifetime
  • Ø3 mm (Ø5 mm) LLG with Yellow Band Insertion Depth Indicator Included with the HPLS343 (HPLS345)
  • Software Control by a PC via USB
  • Open Loop, Closed Loop, and Eco Operating Mode Options

These sources are designed to be used with liquid light guides and can be controlled via front panel controls, a host PC, or by sending voltage signals to connectors on the back panel. Controls include the ability to continuously adjust the amount of light coupled from the bulb into the LLG and to independently toggle the shutter state. When a PC is used to control these light sources, the operator has access to commands and controls not accessible otherwise, including the ability to change the operation mode.

Each of the three operation modes is optimized for different application requirements. Open Loop mode, which is the default, drives the bulb module with current that is near the maximum specified current limit. This gives the user access to the maximum available optical output power, but does not attempt to stabilize the optical output power. Closed Loop mode uses a feedback loop to stabilize the optical output power at 80% of the maximum power achievable in Open Loop mode. Stabilization is performed by adjusting the current level driving the bulb module. Eco mode uses the Closed Loop feedback technique, but it stabilizes the optical output power at 50% of the power achievable in Open Loop mode. As Eco mode drives the bulb module at lower currents, the bulb is subjected to less heat stress; operation in this mode is expected to lengthen the lifetime of the bulb module beyond the typical 10 000 hours lifetime. 

Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available / Ships
HPLS343 Support Documentation
HPLS343High-Power Plasma Light Source and Ø3 mm Liquid Light Guide
$5,070.00
Today
HPLS345 Support Documentation
HPLS345High-Power Plasma Light Source and Ø5 mm Liquid Light Guide
$5,100.00
Today

Liquid Light Guides

Linear Intensity Tuning
Click to Enlarge

As shown above, the LLG is correctly installed when the edge of the yellow band is flush with the front panel of the light source. 
  • Yellow Band Visually Indicates when LLG is Fully Inserted Into the HPLS343 and HPLS345
  • Excellent Transmission from 340 to 800 nm
  • A Homogenous Transmitted Beam and a Light Field Free of Dead Spots
  • Flexble with Minimum Bend Radius of 40 mm (Ø3 mm Core) or 60 mm (Ø5 mm Core)
  • Microscope Collimation Adapters Available Below

Thorlabs' Liquid Light Guides (LLGs) offer outstanding transmission from 340 nm to 800 nm for white light illumination applications. For large core diameters, liquid light guides are a more efficient transmission solution than fiber bundles as they eliminate the packing fraction loss (dead space) in the light fields transmitted by optical fiber bundles. For more information about LLGs, please see the LLGs tab.

The LLGs designed to be used with the HPLS343 and HPLS345 high-power plasma light sources feature a yellow band near one tip. The purpose of this band is to indicate when the LLG is inserted to the correct depth in the LLG Port of these light sources. With the exception of the yellow band, the LLG03-4H and LLG05-4H LLGs are functionally compatible with our standard 4' long LLG0338-4 and LLG0538-4 LLGs, respectively.

Thorlabs also offers collimation adapters for our Ø3 mm and Ø5 mm liquid light guides, which are sold separately below. We also offer an LLG to SM1 adapter for both Ø3 mm and Ø5 mm core LLGs.

Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available / Ships
LLG03-4H Support Documentation
LLG03-4HLiquid Light Guide Ø3 mm Core, 4' (1.2 m) Length, Yellow Banded End for HPLS343
$352.00
Today
LLG05-4H Support Documentation
LLG05-4HLiquid Light Guide Ø5 mm Core, 4' (1.2 m) Length, Yellow Banded End for HPLS345
$454.00
Today

Collimating Microscope Adapters

Microscope Collimator Connected to an HPLS
Click to Enlarge

Output With Collimation Adapter
LLG Without a Collimator
Click to Enlarge

Output Without Collimation Adapter
Microscope Collimator Connected to an HPLS
Click to Enlarge

Collimation Adapter Fitted to the Tip of a LLG

Thorlabs offers collimation adapters with AR-coated aspheric condenser lenses (EFL = 40 mm) for collimating the output from our High-Power Light Sources. Four different collimator housings are available; each is designed to mate to the illumination port on an Olympus IX/BX, Leica DMI, Zeiss Axioskop, or Nikon Eclipse Ti microscope.

These adapters quickly mount onto the end of either the Ø3 mm or Ø5 mm Liquid Light Guide (LLG). The LLG is secured via a setscrew into the back of the collimator. The addition of these adapters allows the user to incorporate our HPLS300 series lamps into a microscope illumination port.

Compatible
Microscopes
Olympus BX & IX
Microscopes
Leica DMI
Microscopes
Zeiss Axioskop
Microscopes
Nikon Eclipse Ti
Microscopes
Item Photo
(Click to Enlarge)
Olympus BX & IX Microscope Adapter Leica DMI Microscope Adapter Zeiss Axioskop Microscope Adapter Nikon Eclipse Ti Microscope Adapter
Item # LLG3A1-A LLG5A1-A LLG3A2-A LLG5A2-A LLG3A4-A LLG5A4-A LLG3A5-A LLG5A5-A
LLG Diameter 3 mm 5 mm 3 mm 5 mm 3 mm 5 mm 3 mm 5 mm
Optic Specifications
Item # ACL5040-A
AR Coating 350 nm - 700 nm
Focal Length 40.00 mm ± 5%
NA 0.554
Magnification Infinite
Surface Quality 60-40 Scratch-Dig
Centration <30 arcmin
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal Price Available / Ships
LLG3A1-A Support Documentation
LLG3A1-AØ3 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Olympus BX / IX, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG5A1-A Support Documentation
LLG5A1-AØ5 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Olympus BX / IX, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG3A2-A Support Documentation
LLG3A2-AØ3 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Leica DMI, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG5A2-A Support Documentation
LLG5A2-AØ5 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Leica DMI, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG3A4-A Support Documentation
LLG3A4-AØ3 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Zeiss Axioskop, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG5A4-A Support Documentation
LLG5A4-AØ5 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Zeiss Axioskop, ARC: 350-700 nm
$316.00
Today
LLG3A5-A Support Documentation
LLG3A5-AØ3 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Nikon Eclipse Ti, ARC: 350-700 nm
$416.00
Today
LLG5A5-A Support Documentation
LLG5A5-AØ5 mm LLG Collimating Adapter, Nikon Eclipse Ti, ARC: 350-700 nm
$416.00
Today
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