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Polarization-Maintaining Single Mode Optical Fiber


Related Items

Custom Fiber Patch Cables  Optical Fiber Manufacturing
Stock Patch Cables Available with these Fibers
TypeFibers Available
StandardFC/PCPM-S405-XP, PM460-HP, PM630-HP,
PM780-HP, PM980-XP, PM1300-XP,
PM1550-XP, PM2000
FC/APC
Hybrid
AR-CoatedPM630-HP, PM780-HP, PM980-XP,
PM1550-XP
Reflective-CoatedPM980-XP

Features

  • Maintain Polarization State of Input
  • Panda or Bow-Tie Style Fiber
  • Specialized Photosensitive and Bend/Temperature-Insensitive Fibers Available

Thorlabs offers both panda and bow-tie style Single Mode Polarization-Maintaining (PM) fiber. The two styles are named based on the stress rods used. Stress rods run parallel to the fiber's core and apply stress that creates birefringence in the fiber's core, allowing polarization-maintaining operation. Panda stress rods are cylindrical, while bow-tie uses trapezoidal prism stress rods, as shown in the images above. For the average user, these two styles are interchangeable. Panda style fibers have historically been used in telecom applications, as it is easier to maintain uniformity in their cylindrical stress rods over very long lengths when manufacturing.

We also offer specialized PM fibers. Our photosensitive fiber can be exposed to UV light to create a Fiber Bragg Grating, and our bend- and temperature-insensitive PM fiber is ideal for use in fiber optic gyroscopes (FOG).

Panda-Style Fibers, Pure Silica Core, 350 - 680 nm

Item #Wavelength
Range
MFDaNAbCut-Off
Wavelength
AttenuationBeat LengthBirefringenceMinimum Bend
Radiusc
Core
Index
Cladding
Index
PM-S350-HP 350 - 460 nm 2.3 µm @ 350 nm 0.12 ≤340 nm - 1.5 mm @ 350 nm 2.5 x 10-4 13 mm Calld Calld
PM-S405-XP 400 - 680 nm 3.3 ± 0.5 µm @ 405 nm
4.6 ± 0.5 µm @ 630 nm
380 ± 20 nm ≤30.0 dB/km @ 488 nm
≤30.0 dB/km @ 630 nm
2.0 mm @ 405 nm 2.5 x 10-4
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • Numerical Aperture (NA) is specified as a nominal value.
  • Minimum bend radius for mechanical reliability.
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Item #Core
Diameter
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Core-Clad
Offset
Coating
Concentricity
Coating
Material
Core
Type
Operating
Temperature Range
Proof Test
Level
Strip
Tool
PM-S350-HP 2.5 µm Ø125 ± 2 µm Ø245 ± 15 µm ≤0.5 µm <5 µm UV Cured
Dual Acrylate
Pure Silica -40 to 85 °C ≥200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2) T06S13
PM-S405-XP 3.0 µm -60 to 85 °C

 

Panda-Style Fibers, 460 - 2200 nm

Item #Wavelength
Range
MFDaNAbCore
Index
Cladding
Index
Cut-Off
Wavelength
AttenuationBeat
Length
BirefringenceNormalized
Cross Talk
Minimum
Bend Radiusc
PM460-HP 460 - 700 nm 3.3 ± 0.5 µm @ 515 nm  0.12 Calld Calld 410 ± 40 nm ≤100 dB/km
@ 488 nm
1.3 mm
@ 460 nm
3.5 x 10-4 -  13 mm
PM630-HP 620 - 850 nm 4.5 ± 0.5 µm @ 630 nm Calld Calld 570 ± 50 nm ≤15 dB/km
@ 630 nm
1.8 mm
@ 630 nm
-
PM780-HP 770 - 1100 nm 5.3 ± 1.0 µm @ 850 nm Calld Calld 710 ± 60 nm ≤4 dB/km @
850 nm
2.4 mm
@ 850 nm
≤-40 dB @ 4 m
≤-30 dB @ 100 m
@ 980 nm
(nominal)
PM980-XP 970 - 1550 nm 6.6 ± 0.7 µm @ 980 nm Calld Calld 920 ± 50 nm ≤2.5 dB/km
@ 980 nm
≤2.7 mm
@ 980 nm
- ≤-40 dB @ 4 m
≤-30 dB @ 100 m
(nominal)
PM1300-XP 1270 - 1625 nm 9.3 ± 0.5 µm @ 1300 nm Calld Calld 1200 ± 70 nm ≤1.0 dB/km
@ 1300 nm
≤4.0 mm
@ 1300 nm
-
PM14XX-HP 1390 - 1625 nm 9.8 ± 0.8 µm @ 1450 nm 0.13 Calld Calld 1320 ± 60 nm <1.0 dB/km
@ 1450 nm
≤4.7 mm
@ 1450 nm
-
PM1550-XP 1440 - 1625 nm 9.9 ± 0.5 µm @ 1550 nm 0.125 Calld Calld 1370 ± 70 nm <1.0 dB/km
@ 1550 nm
≤5.0 mm
@ 1550 nm
- ≤-40 dB @ 4 m
@ 1550 nm
PM2000 1850 - 2200 nm 8.0 µm @ 1950 nm 0.20 Calld Calld 1720 ± 80 nm <11.5 dB/km
@ 1950 nm
<22.5 dB/km
@ 2000 nm
5.2 mm
@ 1950 nm
- -
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • Numerical Aperture (NA) is specified as a nominal value.
  • Minimum bend radius for mechanical reliability.
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Item #Core
Diameter
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Core-Clad
Offset
Coating
Concentricity
Coating
Material
Operating
Temperature Range
Proof Test
Level
Strip Tool
PM460-HP 3.0 µm Ø125 ± 2 µm Ø245 ± 15 µm ≤0.5 µm <5 µm UV-Cured
Dual Acrylate
-40 to 85 °C ≥200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2) T06S13
PM630-HP 3.5 µm
PM780-HP 4.5 µm
PM980-XP 5.5 µm 200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2)
PM1300-XP 8.0 µm ≥200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2)
PM14XX-HP - 200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2)
PM1550-XP 8.5 µm ≥200 kpsi (1.4 GN/m2)
PM2000 7.0 µm ≥100 kpsi (0.7 GN/m2)

 

Photosensitive Panda-Style Fiber, 980 nm

Item #Operating
Wavelength
MFDNACore
Index
Cladding
Index
Cut-Off
Wavelength
AttenuationBeat
Length
Normalized
Cross Talk
PS-PM980 980 nm 10.4 ± 0.8 μm @ 1550 nm 0.12 Calla Calla 900 ± 70 nm ≤3.0 dB/km @ 980 nm ≤3.3 mm @ 980 nm ≤-40 dB @ 2 m
≤-25 dB @ 100 m (nominal)
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Item #Core
Diameter
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Core-Clad
Offset
Coating
Concentricity
Coating
Material
Operating
Temperature Range
Proof Test
Level
Strip
Tool
PS-PM980 6.0 µm Ø125 ± 1.5 µm Ø245 ± 15 µm <0.5 µm ≤5 µm UV Cured
Dual Acrylate
-40 to 85 °C ≥100 kpsi (0.7 GN/m2) T06S13

 

Bow-Tie-Style Fibers, 980 - 1550 nm

Item #Design WavelengthaMFDbNACore IndexcCladding IndexcCut-Off WavelengthAttenuationBeat Lengthd
HB980T 980 nm 6.0 µm 0.13 - 0.15 980 nm: 1.45647e 980 nm: 1.45068e 870 - 970 nm <3 dB/km <2 mm
HB1250T 1310 nm 9.0 µm 0.11 - 0.13 1310 nm: 1.45094f 1310 nm: 1.44680f 1100 - 1290 nm <2 dB/km <2 mm
HB1500T 1550 nm 10.5 µm 0.11 - 0.13 1550 nm: 1.44813f 1550 nm: 1.44399f 1290 - 1540 nm <2 dB/km <2 mm
  • The Design Wavelength is the wavelength (or wavelengths) at which the fiber is typically used. In practice, the fiber will transmit the TEM00 mode at wavelengths of up to approximately 200 nm longer than the cut-off wavelength.
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • The index provided is nominal, at nominal operating wavelength.
  • The Beat Length is measured at 633 nm for all HB fiber types. To a first approximation, beat length scales directly with operating wavelength.
  • The index provided is for an NA of 0.13.
  • The index provided is for an NA of 0.11.
Item #Cladding DiameterCoating DiameterCore-Clad ConcentricityCoating MaterialProof Test LevelStrip Tool
HB980T Ø125 ± 1 µm Ø245 µm ± 5% <0.6 µm Dual-Layer Acrylate 100 or 200 kpsi
(0.7 or 1.4 GN/m2)
(1% or 2%)
T06S13
HB1250T Ø400 µm ± 5% -
HB1500T -

 

Bend- and Temperature-Insensitive Bow-Tie-Style Fiber, 800 - 1000 nm

Item #Design WavelengthaMFDbNACore IndexcCladding IndexcCut-Off WavelengthAttenuationBeat Lengthd
HB800G 830 nm 4.2 µm 0.14 - 0.18 830 nm: 1.45954e 830 nm: 1.45282e 680 - 780 nm <5 dB/km <1.5 mm
  • The fiber will transmit the TEM00 mode at wavelengths up to approximately 200 nm longer than the cutoff wavelength.
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • The index provided is nominal, at nominal operating wavelength.
  • The Beat Length is measured at 633 nm for all HB fiber types. To a first approximation, beat length scales directly with operating wavelength.
  • The index provided is for an NA of 0.14
Item #Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Core-Clad
Concentricity
Coating MaterialProof Test LevelStrip Tool
PS-PM980 Ø80 ± 1 µm Ø245 µm ± 5 % <1 µm or 0.05 µm UV Cured Dual Acrylate 100 or 200 kpsi
(0.7 or 1.4 GN/m2) (1% or 2%)
T04S10

Definition of the Mode Field Diameter

The mode field diameter (MFD) is one measure of the beam size of light propagating in a single mode fiber. It is a function of wavelength, core radius, and the refractive indices of the core and cladding. While much of the light in an optical fiber is trapped within the fiber core, a small fraction propagates in the cladding. For a Gaussian power distribution, the MFD is the diameter where the optical power is reduced to 1/e2 from its peak level.

Measurement of MFD
The measurement of MFD is accomplished by the Variable Aperture Method in the Far Field (VAMFF). An aperture is placed in the far field of the fiber output, and the intensity is measured. As successively smaller apertures are placed in the beam, the intensity levels are measured for each aperture; the data can then be plotted as power vs. the sine of the aperture half-angle (or the numerical aperture).

The MFD is then determined using Petermann's second definition, which is a mathematical model that does not assume a specific shape of power distribution. The MFD in the near field can be determined from this far-field measurement using the Hankel Transform.

Power Handling Limitations Imposed by Optical Fiber
Click to Enlarge
Undamaged Fiber End
Power Handling Limitations Imposed by Optical Fiber
Click to Enlarge
Damaged Fiber End

Laser Induced Damage in Optical Fibers

The following tutorial details damage mechanisms in unterminated (bare) and terminated optical fibers, including damage mechanisms at both the air-to-glass interface and within the glass of the optical fiber. Please note that while general rules and scaling relations can be defined, absolute damage thresholds in optical fibers are extremely application dependent and user specific. This tutorial should only be used as a guide to estimate the damage threshold of an optical fiber in a given application. Additionally, all calculations below only apply if all cleaning and use recommendations listed in the last section of this tutorial have been followed. For further discussion about an optical fiber’s power handling abilities within a specific application, contact Thorlabs’ Tech Support.

Damage at the Free Space-to-Fiber Interface

There are several potential damage mechanisms that can occur at the free space-to-fiber interface when coupling light into a fiber. These come into play whether the fiber is used bare or terminated in a connector.

Silica Optical Fiber Maximum Power Densities
TypeTheoretical Damage ThresholdPractical Safe Value
CW
(Average Power)
1 MW/cm2250 kW/cm2
10 ns Pulsed
(Peak Power)
5 GW/cm21 GW/cm2

Unterminated (Bare) Fiber
Damage mechanisms in bare optical fiber can be modeled similarly to bulk optics, and industry-standard damage thresholds for UV Fused Silica substrates can be applied to silica-based fiber (refer to the table to the right). The surface areas and beam diameters involved at the air-to-glass interface are extremely small compared to bulk optics, especially with single mode (SM) fiber, resulting in very small damage thresholds.

The effective area for SM fiber is defined by the mode field diameter (MFD), which is the effective cross-sectional area through which light propagates in the fiber. A free-space beam of light must be focused down to a spot of roughly 80% of this diameter to be coupled into the fiber with good efficiency. MFD increases roughly linearly with wavelength, which yields a roughly quadratic increase in damage threshold with wavelength. Additionally, a beam coupled into SM fiber typically has a Gaussian-like profile, resulting in a higher power density at the center of the beam compared with the edges, so a safety margin must be built into the calculated damage threshold value if the calculations assume a uniform density.

Multimode (MM) fiber’s effective area is defined by the core diameter, which is typically far larger than the MFD in SM fiber. Kilowatts of power can be typically coupled into multimode fiber without damage, due to the larger core size and the resulting reduced power density.

It is typically uncommon to use single mode fibers for pulsed applications with high per-pulse powers because the beam needs to be focused down to a very small area for coupling, resulting in a very high power density. It is also uncommon to use SM fiber with ultraviolet light because the MFD becomes extremely small; thus, power handling becomes very low, and coupling becomes very difficult.

Example Calculation
For SM400 single mode fiber operating at 400 nm with CW light, the mode field diameter (MFD) is approximately Ø3 µm. For good coupling efficiency, 80% of the MFD is typically filled with light. This yields an effective diameter of Ø2.4 µm and an effective area of 4.52 µm2:

Area = πr2 = π(MFD/2)2 = π • 1.22 µm2 = 4.52 µm2

This can be extrapolated to a damage threshold of 11.3 mW. We recommend using the "practical value" maximum power density from the table above to account for a Gaussian power distribution, possible coupling misalignment, and contaminants or imperfections on the fiber end face:

250 kW/cm2 = 2.5 mW/µm2

4.25 µm2 • 2.5 mW/µm2 = 11.3 mW

Terminated Fiber
Optical fiber that is terminated in a connector has additional power handling considerations. Fiber is typically terminated by being epoxied into a ceramic or steel ferrule, which forms the interfacing surface of the connector. When light is coupled into the fiber, light that does not enter the core and propagate down the fiber is scattered into the outer layers of the fiber, inside the ferrule.

The scattered light propagates into the epoxy that holds the fiber in the ferrule. If the light is intense enough, it can melt the epoxy, causing it to run onto the face of the connector and into the beam path. The epoxy can be burned off, leaving residue on the end of the fiber, which reduces coupling efficiency and increases scattering, causing further damage. The lack of epoxy between the fiber and ferrule can also cause the fiber to be decentered, which reduces the coupling efficiency and further increases scattering and damage.

The power handling of terminated optical fiber scales with wavelength for two reasons. First, the higher per photon energy of short-wavelength light leads to a greater likelihood of scattering, which increases the optical power incident on the epoxy near the end of the connector. Second, shorter-wavelength light is inherently more difficult to couple into SM fiber due to the smaller MFD, as discussed above. The greater likelihood of light not entering the fiber’s core again increases the chance of damaging scattering effects. This second effect is not as common with MM fibers because their larger core sizes allow easier coupling in general, including with short-wavelength light.

Fiber connectors can be constructed to have an epoxy-free air gap between the optical fiber and ferrule near the fiber end face. This design feature, commonly used with multimode fiber, allows some of the connector-related damage mechanisms to be avoided. Our high-power multimode fiber patch cables use connectors with this design feature.

Combined Damage Thresholds
As a general guideline, for short-wavelength light at around 400 nm, scattering within connectors typically limits the power handling of optical fiber to about 300 mW. Note that this limit is higher than the limit set by the optical power density at the fiber tip. However, power handing limitations due to connector effects do not diminish as rapidly with wavelength when compared to power density effects. Thus, a terminated fiber’s power handling is "connector-limited" at wavelengths above approximately 600 nm and is "fiber-limited" at lower wavelengths.

The graph to the right shows the power handling limitations imposed by the fiber itself and a surrounding connector. The total power handling of a terminated fiber at a given wavelength is limited by the lower of the two limitations at that wavelength. The fiber-limited (blue) line is for SM fibers. An equivalent line for multimode fiber would be far above the SM line on the Y-axis. For terminated multimode fibers, the connector-limited (red) line always determines the damage threshold.

Please note that the values in this graph are rough guidelines detailing estimates of power levels where damage is very unlikely with proper handling and alignment procedures. It is worth noting that optical fibers are frequently used at power levels above those described here. However, damage is likely in these applications. The optical fiber should be considered a consumable lab supply if used at power levels above those recommended by Thorlabs.

Damage Within Optical Fibers

In addition to damage mechanisms at the air-to-glass interface, optical fibers also display power handling limitations due to damage mechanisms within the optical fiber itself. Two categories of damage within the fiber are damage from bend losses and damage from photodarkening.

Bend Losses
Bend losses occur when a fiber is bent to a point where light traveling in the core is incident on the core/cladding interface at an angle higher than the critical angle, making total internal reflection impossible.Under these circumstances, light escapes the fiber, often in one localized area. The light escaping the fiber typically has a high power density, which can cause burns to the fiber as well as any surrounding furcation tubing.

A special category of optical fiber, called double-clad fiber, can reduce the risk of bend-loss damage by allowing the fiber’s cladding (2nd layer) to also function as a waveguide in addition to the core. By making the critical angle of the cladding/coating interface higher than the critical angle of the core/clad interface, light that escapes the core is loosely confined within the cladding. It will then leak out over a distance of centimeters or meters instead of at one localized spot within the fiber, minimizing damage. Thorlabs manufactures and sells 0.22 NA double-clad multimode fiber, which boasts very high, megawatt range power handling.

Photodarkening
A second damage mechanism within optical fiber, called photodarkening or solarization, typically occurs over time in fibers used with ultraviolet or short-wavelength visible light. The pure silica core of standard multimode optical fiber can transmit ultraviolet light, but the attenuation at these short wavelengths increases with the time exposed to the light. The mechanism that causes photodarkening is largely unknown, but several strategies have been developed to combat it. Fibers with a very low hydroxyl ion (OH) content have been found to resist photodarkening. Other dopants, including fluorine, can also reduce photodarkening.

Germanium-doped silica, which is commonly used for the core of single mode fiber for red or IR wavelengths, can experience photodarkening with blue visible light. Thus, pure silica core single mode fibers are typically used with short wavelength visible light. Single mode fibers are typically not used with UV light due to the small MFD at these wavelengths, which makes coupling extremely difficult.

Even with the above strategies in place, all fibers eventually experience photodarkening when used with UV light, and thus, fibers used with these wavelengths should be considered consumables.

Tips for Maximizing an Optical Fiber's Power Handling Capability

With a clear understanding of the power-limiting mechanisms of an optical fiber, strategies can be implemented to increase a fiber’s power handling capability and reduce the risk of damage in a given application. All of the calculations above only apply if the following strategies are implemented.

One of the most important aspects of a fiber’s power-handling capability is the quality of the end face. The end face should be clean and clear of dirt and other contaminants that can cause scattering of coupled light. Additionally, if working with bare fiber, the end of the fiber should have a good quality cleave, and any splices should be of good quality to prevent scattering at interfaces.

The alignment process for coupling light into optical fiber is also important to avoid damage to the fiber. During alignment, before optimum coupling is achieved, light may be easily focused onto parts of the fiber other than the core. If a high power beam is focused on the cladding or other parts of the fiber, scattering can occur, causing damage.

Additionally, terminated fibers should not be plugged in or unplugged while the light source is on, again so that focused beams of light are not incident on fragile parts of the connector, possibly causing damage.

Bend losses, discussed above, can cause localized burning in an optical fiber when a large amount of light escapes the fiber in a small area. Fibers carrying large amounts of light should be secured to a steady surface along their entire length to avoid being disturbed or bent.

Additionally, choosing an appropriate optical fiber for a given application can help to avoid damage. Large-mode-area fibers are a good alternative to standard single mode fibers in high-power applications. They provide good beam quality with a larger MFD, thereby decreasing power densities. Standard single mode fibers are also not generally used for ultraviolet applications or high-peak-power pulsed applications due to the high spatial power densities these applications present.

Click the Support Documentation icon document icon or Part Number below to view the available support documentation
Part Number Product Description
HB1250T Support Documentation HB1250T : Design Wavelength: 1310 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 9.0 µm MFD
HB1500T Support Documentation HB1500T : Design Wavelength: 1550 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 10.5 µm MFD
HB800G Support Documentation HB800G : Design Wavelength: 830 nm, FOG Optimized PM Fiber, 4.2 µm MFD
HB980T Support Documentation HB980T : Design Wavelength: 980 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 6.0 µm MFD
PM1300-XP Support Documentation PM1300-XP : 1270 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.3 µm MFD
PM14XX-HP Support Documentation PM14XX-HP : 1390 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.8 µm MFD
PM1550-XP Support Documentation PM1550-XP : 1440 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.9 µm MFD
PM2000 Support Documentation PM2000 : 1850 - 2200 nm PM Fiber, 8.0 µm MFD
Part Number Product Description
PM460-HP Support Documentation PM460-HP : 460 - 700 nm PM Fiber, 3.3 µm MFD
PM630-HP Support Documentation PM630-HP : 620 - 850 nm PM Fiber, 4.5 µm MFD
PM780-HP Support Documentation PM780-HP : 770 - 1100 nm PM Fiber, 5.3 µm MFD
PM980-XP Support Documentation PM980-XP : 970 - 1550 nm PM Fiber, 6.6 µm MFD
PM-S350-HP Support Documentation PM-S350-HP : 350 - 460 nm PM Fiber w/ Pure Silica Core, 2.3 µm MFD
PM-S405-XP Support Documentation PM-S405-XP : 400 - 680 nm PM Fiber w/ Pure Silica Core, 3.5 - 4.6 µm MFD
PS-PM980 Support Documentation PS-PM980 : PM Photosensitive Fiber, 980 nm

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Posted Comments:
Poster: pbui
Posted Date: 2014-06-12 03:41:34.0
We will contact you directly to provide the dispersion graphs for these fibers.
Poster: sebastian.schweyer
Posted Date: 2014-05-22 04:56:08.41
Could you send me please the dispersion curves for different NAs and Cut-Off Wavelengths for following fibers: - PM1300-HP - PM14XX-HP - PM1550-XP D Hereby most important would be the dispersion and dispersion slope @1560 nm. Cheers !
Poster: pbui
Posted Date: 2014-05-01 04:12:59.0
We will contact you directly to provide the dispersion data for the operating wavelengths of this fiber.
Poster: scottie730318
Posted Date: 2014-04-27 23:15:17.073
We are interesting in PM fiber PM980-XP). Our ring cavity is designed to short cavity length. Therefore, can you provide me the GVD(ps/nm*km) of PM fiber around 1.06 um??Thank you very much
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-08-15 10:07:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your inquiry. We are accumulating data on the dispersion at this wavelength and I will contact you to keep you updated with the results.
Poster: leaf
Posted Date: 2012-08-14 08:45:08.0
Please send me the dispersion data for PM780-HP and PM980-XP around 1060 nm. Thanks!
Poster: Mojtaba.Mansourabadi
Posted Date: 2012-07-14 12:00:55.0
Hi, I need the following parameters: 1- Core Diameter 2- Core Refractive Index 3- Cladding Refractive Index
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-06-19 09:55:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for contacting us! I have sent you the dispersion data.
Poster: andreas.bollmann
Posted Date: 2012-06-19 15:05:59.0
Hi, can you give me the dispersion curve of PM980-XP around 1064 nm? Best regards.
Poster: tcohen
Posted Date: 2012-04-09 12:17:00.0
Response from Tim at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback! I have contacted you with some dispersion data.
Poster: yequnz
Posted Date: 2012-04-06 14:36:31.0
I want to the chromatic dispersion and polarization-mode dispersion at the wavelength around 700nm. Thanks.
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2011-10-20 14:26:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. We are working on adding more information to our website. We have contacted you with the dispersion curve for the 780-HP fiber. Since the fundamental waveguide design is the same, the data should provide a good estimate.
Poster: kristian.altmann
Posted Date: 2011-10-12 11:18:33.0
Hi, I just want to ask about the dispersion curve for the PM780-HP. Best Regards
Poster: jjurado
Posted Date: 2011-07-14 09:32:00.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to delosrey: I will contact you directly with a dispersion curve for the PM780-HP fiber in the 600-1000 nm range.
Poster: delosrey
Posted Date: 2011-07-13 15:14:23.0
Hi, I just want to ask about the dispersion curve for the PM780-HP. I plan to use this in my set-up but I want to make sure that I could still recover the 65fm pulse width of my input beam.
Poster: bdada
Posted Date: 2011-06-24 12:41:00.0
Response from Buki at Thorlabs: Thank you for your feedback. We apologize for the inconsistency. The specification sheet is correct, so the cut off wavelength for the PM460-HP is 410 +/- 40nm. We will update the specification tables on the web page.
Poster:
Posted Date: 2011-06-23 19:30:04.0
Spec sheet shows 410 ± 40 nm for the PM460-HPs cutoff wavelength, but the web consistently shows 420 ± 30 nm. Which is correct?
Poster: tor
Posted Date: 2011-01-10 15:15:06.0
Response from Tor at Thorlabs to zyan: Thank you for your request. The cut-off is defined in this context as a lower-bound. PM460-HP, PM-S630-HP, and PM630-HP work for 632.8-nm input. Panda-style fibers have historically been used in telecom applications, as it is easier to maintain uniformity in their cylindrical stress rods over very long lengths when manufacturing. The average user can use both types interchangeably. I will contact you for further details so I can generate a formal quotation.
Poster: tor
Posted Date: 2011-01-10 14:50:52.0
Response from Tor at Thorlabs to Keli: Thank you for your interest in our PM fiber. The HP designation does not refer to power-handling capabilities of the fiber. The typical guideline for the damage threshold of SM fiber is 10 mW/µm² or (1 MW/cm²) for CW and 1 GW/cm² for 10-ns pulses.
Poster: zyan
Posted Date: 2010-12-14 13:53:01.0
Hi, How do you define cut-off, it looks that the cut-off mismatches the designed frequency. For example, can I use 632.8 nm wavelength for this fiber. Secondly, do you have any connectorized fiber. How can we access to this service. Obvious it requires much sophisticated equipment to do FC/PC connector with such short wavelength and small core diameter ones. How can we link this request to the fibers. Third, any reason for Bow-Tie versus Panda? Thank, ZY
Poster: keli
Posted Date: 2010-12-13 11:53:04.0
What dose HP in the item number mean? What is its highest power tolerance? Thanks.
Poster: tor
Posted Date: 2010-12-10 08:23:14.0
Response from Tor at Thorlabs to Mirko: We are happy to provide MFD data for specific production runs upon request. Nufern employs the same MFD measurement technique as described in this document: www.corning.com/WorkArea/downloadasset.aspx?id=7909 . I will contact you directly to help you find specific MFD data.
Poster: mirko.uebernickel
Posted Date: 2010-12-09 03:30:14.0
Dir sir or madam, please give me some detailed information about the defintion of the mode-field-diameter of the fiber pm980. The exact diameter definition is needed for calculations with this product. Best regards. Mirko Uebernickel
Poster: Javier
Posted Date: 2010-06-17 09:54:22.0
Response from Javier at Thorlabs to c.j.lee: the variation in the polarization axis orientation is most likely due to a mechanical shift of your setup over time, rather than to phenomena in the fiber itself. I will contact you directly to discuss this further.
Poster: c.j.lee
Posted Date: 2010-06-17 04:23:38.0
We are currently using your Panda style PM fibres in a polarization setup. We have noticed that over time, the orientation of the polarization axis of the fibre varies by about 3°. Is this expected, or is it more likely that our polarization state on the input is not what we think it is?
Poster: Adam
Posted Date: 2010-04-26 14:59:02.0
A response from Adam at Thorlabs to yekaterinala: We can offer an extra 2% of the price of the HB980T and the PM980-XP when 300 or 500m are orders. I will contact you directly to see if you are interested in a quotation.
Poster: yekaterinala
Posted Date: 2010-04-25 23:22:53.0
Please let me know meter price for HB980T for 300m and 500m Thanks Yekaterina yekaterinala@mvphotonics.com
Poster: yekaterinala
Posted Date: 2010-04-25 23:18:42.0
Hi, Please let me know price per meter for PM980-XP for 300m and 500m length. Thanks, Yekaterina yekaterinala@mvphotonics.com
Poster: Laurie
Posted Date: 2009-01-28 16:36:30.0
Response from Laurie at Thorlabs to chan0753: Thank you for your interest in our PM single mode fibers. Currently, we do not have a panda-style, PM, single mode fiber for the entire visible range. I will have an applications engineer contact you directly to discuss your specific application and determine if we have an appropriate fiber for you.
Poster: chan0753
Posted Date: 2009-01-28 10:35:52.0
Hi, I am interested in the polarization maintaining single-mode fibers (Panda style, pure silica core) for the range in 400nm -700nm. Do you mind giving me the more detailed absorption spectra of those fibers to help me decide which one to get? Thanks, Wing
Poster: Tyler
Posted Date: 2009-01-15 08:31:45.0
A response from Tyler at Thorlabs to guuptasengupta: Thank you for your feedback. Thorlabs is dedicated to providing a comprehensive line of photonics components and instruments. If you have any product needs that we currently don’t fill, please let us know as we are always looking for ways to improve our product line so that scientists can spend more time in the lab and less time looking for the proper equipment.
Poster: guuptasengupta
Posted Date: 2009-01-15 01:27:54.0
it is the only supplier and proved to be the genuine supplyer of the research based equipments
Poster: Laurie
Posted Date: 2009-01-05 16:34:23.0
Response from Laurie at Thorlabs to msaffman: Thank you for your interest in our single mode PM fiber. Currently, we do not offer as a stock item any PM fibers for the 320 nm wavelength. However, if you provide us with additional specifications (length, NA, etc.), we will look into the possibility of obtaining this fiber as a special.
Poster: msaffman
Posted Date: 2009-01-05 12:49:49.0
Can you provide single mode polarization maintaining fiber for 320 nm wavelength light? I am looking for this fiber in lengths of at least 50 cm. Thanks, Mark Saffman
Poster: Tyler
Posted Date: 2008-09-12 14:00:03.0
A response from Tyler at Thorlabs to david.rahmlow: The nominal NA of the FS-LS-4616 fiber is 0.13. Thank you for your interest in our fiber products.
Poster: david.rahmlow
Posted Date: 2008-09-11 14:18:37.0
Whats the NA of the FS-LS-4616 fiber? Thanks- --- Dave
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PM Fiber, Panda Style, Pure Silica Core, 350 - 680 nm

Panda PM Fiber Cross Section
Click for Details

Panda-Style PM Fiber Cross Section
  • Pure Silica Core for Resistance to Photodarkening
  • Panda-Style Stress Members
  • Operating Wavelength Ranges Span from 350 to 680 nm

These pure silica core polarization-maintaining fibers are designed for wavelengths from 350 to 680 nm. Their pure silica core provides protection from photodarkening, which makes them ideal for use at short wavelengths. These fibers use Panda-type stress rods for polarization-maintaining operation.

Item #Wavelength
Range
MFDaNAbCore
Index
Cladding
Index
Cut-OffAttenuationBeat
Length
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Minimum
Bend Radiusc
Strip
Tool
PM-S350-HP 350 - 460 nm 2.3 µm
@ 350 nm
0.12 Calld Calld ≤340 nm - 1.5 mm
@ 350 nm
Ø125 ± 2 µm Ø245 ± 15 µm 13 mm T06S13
PM-S405-XP 400 - 680 nm 3.3 ± 0.5 µm
@ 405 nm
4.6 ± 0.5 µm
@ 630 nm
380 ± 20 nm ≤30.0 dB/km
@ 488 nm
≤30.0 dB/km
@ 630 nm
2.0 mm
@ 405 nm
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • Numerical Aperture (NA) is specified as a nominal value.
  • Minimum bend radius for mechanical reliability.
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PM-S350-HP Support Documentation
PM-S350-HP 350 - 460 nm PM Fiber w/ Pure Silica Core, 2.3 µm MFD
$33.00
Per Meter
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PM-S405-XP Support Documentation
PM-S405-XP 400 - 680 nm PM Fiber w/ Pure Silica Core, 3.5 - 4.6 µm MFD
$30.00
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PM Fiber, Panda Style, 460 - 2200 nm

Panda PM Fiber Cross Section
Click for Details

Panda-Style PM Fiber Cross Section
  • Operating Wavelength Ranges Span from 460 to 2200 nm
  • Panda-Style Stress Members

These polarization-maintaining fibers are designed for single-mode transmission in the visible, NIR, and telecom wavelength ranges. They have Panda-type stress rods for polarization-maintaining operation.

Item #Wavelength
Range
MFDaNAbCore
Index
Cladding
Index
Cut-OffAttenuationBeat
Length
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Minimum
Bend Radiusc
Strip
Tool
PM460-HP 460 - 700 nm 3.3 ± 0.5 µm
@ 515 nm
0.12 Calld Calld 410 ± 40 nm ≤100 dB/km
@ 488 nm
1.3 mm
@ 460 nm
Ø125 ± 2 µm Ø245 ± 15 µm 13 mm T06S13
PM630-HP 620 - 850 nm 4.5 ± 0.5 µm
@ 630 nm
570 ± 50 nm ≤15 dB/km
@ 630 nm
1.8 mm
@ 630 nm
PM780-HP 770 - 1100 nm 5.3 ± 1.0 µm
@ 850 nm
710 ± 60 nm ≤4 dB/km
@ 850 nm
2.4 mm
@ 850 nm
PM980-XP 970 - 1550 nm 6.6 ± 0.7 µm
@ 980 nm
920 ± 50 nm ≤2.5 dB/km
@ 980 nm
≤2.7 mm
@ 980 nm
PM1300-XP 1270 - 1625 nm 9.3 ± 0.5 µm
@ 1300 nm
1200 ± 70 nm ≤1.0 dB/km
@ 1300 nm
≤4.0 mm
@ 1300 nm
PM14XX-HP 1390 - 1625 nm 9.8 ± 0.8 µm
@ 1450 nm
0.13 1320 ± 60 nm <1.0 dB/km
@ 1450 nm
≤4.7 mm
@ 1450 nm
PM1550-XP 1440 - 1625 nm 9.9 ± 0.5 µm
@ 1550 nm
0.125 1370 ± 70 nm <1.0 dB/km
@ 1550 nm
≤5.0 mm
@ 1550 nm
PM2000 1850 - 2200 nm 8.0 µm
@ 1950 nm
0.20 1720 ± 80 nm ≤11.5 dB/km
@ 1950 nm
≤22.5 dB/km
@ 2000 nm
5.2 mm
@ 1950 nm
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • Numerical Aperture (NA) is specified as a nominal value.
  • Minimum bend radius for mechanical reliability.
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PM460-HP Support Documentation
PM460-HP 460 - 700 nm PM Fiber, 3.3 µm MFD
$27.30
Per Meter
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PM630-HP Support Documentation
PM630-HP 620 - 850 nm PM Fiber, 4.5 µm MFD
$19.60
Per Meter
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PM780-HP Support Documentation
PM780-HP 770 - 1100 nm PM Fiber, 5.3 µm MFD
$19.60
Per Meter
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PM980-XP Support Documentation
PM980-XP 970 - 1550 nm PM Fiber, 6.6 µm MFD
$24.50
Per Meter
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PM1300-XP Support Documentation
PM1300-XP 1270 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.3 µm MFD
$24.50
Per Meter
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PM14XX-HP Support Documentation
PM14XX-HP 1390 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.8 µm MFD
$24.50
Per Meter
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PM1550-XP Support Documentation
PM1550-XP 1440 - 1625 nm PM Fiber, 9.9 µm MFD
$24.50
Per Meter
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PM2000 Support Documentation
PM2000 Customer Inspired! 1850 - 2200 nm PM Fiber, 8.0 µm MFD
$41.69
Per Meter
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Photosensitive PM Fiber, Panda-Style, 980 nm

Panda PM Fiber Cross Section
Click for Details

Panda-Style PM Fiber Cross Section

Applications

  • Grating-Based Pump Diode Pigtails
  • Sensors
  • Multiplexers

Features

  • Typical PM Fiber Performance with Added Photosensitivity
  • Panda-Style Stress Members
  • High Photosensitivity
  • High Lot-to-Lot Uniformity

PS-PM980 photosensitive 980 nm polarization maintaining fiber is designed to perform all functions of a 980 nm PM fiber but with enhanced photosensitivity for fabrication of gratings. Portions of this fiber that are exposed to UV light will have their refractive index changed, thus allowing the construction of a Fiber Bragg Grating or other types of devices with periodic changes in refractive index.

This fiber is designed for use in pump diodes, couplers and multiplexers. Using one fiber that provides excellent photosensitivity, as well as polarization maintaining attributes, substantially reduces writing time thus lowering costs.

Item # Operating
Wavelength
MFD NA Core Index Cladding Index Cut-Off
Wavelength
Attenuation Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Strip Tool
PS-PM980 980 nm 10.4 ± 0.8 µm @ 1550 nm 0.12 Calla Calla 900 ± 70 nm ≤3.0 dB/km @ 980 nm 125 ± 1.5 µm 245 ± 15 µm T06S13
  • Please contact our Technical Support Staff to learn more about the refractive index of this fiber, as we are not permitted to publish this information on our website.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
PS-PM980 Support Documentation
PS-PM980 PM Photosensitive Fiber, 980 nm
$30.70
Per Meter
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PM Fiber, Bow-Tie Style, 980 - 1550 nm

Bow-Tie PM Fiber Cross Section
Click for Details

Bow-Tie-Style PM Fiber Cross Section
  • Operating Wavelength Ranges Span from 980 to 1550 nm
  • Bow-Tie-Style Stress Members

These polarization-maintaining fibers use bow-tie stress members. They are commonly used for sensor applications, polarization multiplexing of EDFA lasers, and laser pigtailing.

Item #Design
Wavelength(s)a
MFDbNACore
Indexc
Cladding
Indexc
Cut-OffAttenuationBeat
Lengthd
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Strip
Tool
HB980T 980 nm 6.0 µm 0.13 - 0.15 980 nm: 1.45647e 980 nm: 1.45068e 870 - 970 nm <3 dB/km <2 mm Ø125 ± 1 µm 245 µm ± 5% T06S13
HB1250T 1310 nm 9.0 µm 0.11 - 0.13 1310 nm: 1.45094f 1310 nm: 1.44680f 1100 - 1290 nm <2 dB/km <2 mm Ø125 ± 1 µm 400 µm ± 5% N/A
HB1500T 1550 nm 10.5 µm 0.11 - 0.13 1550 nm: 1.44813f 1550 nm: 1.44399f 1290 - 1540 nm <2 dB/km <2 mm Ø125 ± 1 µm 400 µm ± 5% N/A
  • The fiber will transmit the TEM00 mode at wavelengths up to approximately 200 nm longer than the cutoff wavelength.
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • The index provided is nominal, at nominal operating wavelength.
  • The Beat Length is measured at 633 nm for all HB fiber types. To a first approximation, beat length scales directly with operating wavelength.
  • The index of refraction provided is for an NA of 0.13.
  • The index of refraction provided is for an NA of 0.11.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
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HB980T Support Documentation
HB980T Design Wavelength: 980 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 6.0 µm MFD
$18.80
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HB1250T Support Documentation
HB1250T Design Wavelength: 1310 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 9.0 µm MFD
$18.80
Per Meter
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HB1500T Support Documentation
HB1500T Design Wavelength: 1550 nm, Telecom Optimized PM Fiber, 10.5 µm MFD
$18.80
Per Meter
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Bend- and Temperature-Insensitive PM Fiber, Bow-Tie Style, 800 - 1000 nm

Bow-Tie PM Fiber Cross Section
Click for Details

Bow-Tie-Style PM Fiber Cross Section
  • Optimized for Bend- and Temperature-Resistance Performance
  • Ideal for Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG) Applications
  • Bow-Tie-Style Stress Members

This polarization-maintaining fiber is optimized for fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) applications. It is designed for optimal performance over a wide temperature range and with a small coil radius. Extinction ratios of 29.5 dB at -40 °C and 28.5 dB at -60 °C are typical for this fiber.

Item # Design
Wavelength(s)a
MFDb NA Core Indexc Cladding Indexc Cut-Off Attenuation Beat
Lengthd
Cladding
Diameter
Coating
Diameter
Strip
Tool
HB800G 830 nm 4.2 µm 0.14 - 0.18 830 nm: 1.45954e 830 nm: 1.45282e 680 - 780 nm <5 dB/km <1.5 mm Ø80 ± 1 µm 245 µm ± 5% T04S10
  • The fiber will transmit the TEM00 mode at wavelengths up to approximately 200 nm longer than the cutoff wavelength.
  • Mode Field Diameter (MFD) is specified as a nominal value. It is the beam diameter at the 1/e2 power level in the near field. For more information, please see the MFD Definition tab above.
  • The index provided is nominal, at nominal operating wavelength.
  • The Beat Length is measured at 633 nm for all HB fiber types. To a first approximation, beat length scales directly with operating wavelength.
  • The index of refraction provided is for an NA of 0.14.
Based on your currency / country selection, your order will ship from Newton, New Jersey  
+1 Qty Docs Part Number - Universal/Imperial Price Available / Ships
HB800G Support Documentation
HB800G Design Wavelength: 830 nm, FOG Optimized PM Fiber, 4.2 µm MFD
$18.80
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